Monday, February 8, 2010

20 Dog Breeds That Make Great Running Companions


Photo From Flickr

Many dogs make great running partners. Running is a great way to bond with your dog and keep them in shape. Generally, running dogs are medium sized and have short hair. Also, there are three important qualities that make a great running dog:

  • Their genetic temperament, is it friendly or not?
  • How well they're socialized.
  • How well they're trained.

There are many active breeds out there but not all of them are made for running. Here are the ones that work well for this sport.

Short Distance Running

1. Greyhound
These dogs were born to run (as the famous Bruce Springsteen
song says). The biggest misconception is that they like to run for miles and miles. They don't. They will most likely run for 2 to 3 minutes and then become a couch potato the rest of the day. If you are a sprint runner or like to go for quick jogs, this dog is ideal for that. The only caveat this dog will be prone to chasing small animals.

2. Whippet
These are very similar to the Greyhound. They are friendly and I would say the biggest difference is the large curve in their back. They can run up to 35 mph (Greyhounds run up to 45 mph). They are sight hounds known for their sweet and gentle nature.

Long Distance Running

3. American Pit Bull Terrier
This strong dog is a great running companion. They have a high activity level and love to run. They have enormous endurance as well. It's important that these dogs are well-socialized since they can have an aggressive streak toward other dogs.

4. American Staffordshire Terrier
These dogs are very similar to the Pit Bull but have these differences: It has a larger head and is a heavier dog than the American Pit Bull Terrier. Also, these dogs are registered as American Pit Bull Terriers in England but are registered under the American Staffordshire Terrier in the U.S. Pit Bull Terriers are registered as a separate breed in the states. This breed is gentle towards children when socialized as a puppy.

5. Australian Cattle Dog
Never known by just one name, this famous breed is also called a Queensland Heeler. You may even hear there goes a Red Heeler and Blue Heeler which are in reference to the dog's coat color. These dogs are only about 18 inches(45.7 cm) high and weigh 35 pounds (16 kg). They are not dogs for children but have a strong work ethic that will make a great running partner.

6. Australian Shepherd
This dog is good for running. It's a shepherd dog so you may have to correct its inclination to run in circles as shepherd dogs are known to do. They have longer hair than the Australian Cattle Dog so it's best to run with them when the weather is cooler.

7. Border Collies
These medium-sized dogs are ideal for running. Considered one of the most intelligent dogs, these dogs get bored easily and have a high energy level. Known for soaring to the top in agility, these dogs are an ideal match for running.

8. Boxer
These dogs are one of the best for running. They have the idea size and coat type. They are generally friendly but may have a tendency to chase smaller animals since they were bred to hunt them originally. Also, with their short muzzle, you have to watch out for them in the hot summer weather.

9. Brittany Spaniel
These dogs are highly intelligent with a need to please. They have a high activity level. If they're not utilized properly, they will become destructive. They also need an experienced owner who will be assertive with them so they know their place in the pack, otherwise they can be nervous.

10. Coon Hounds
These are a rare breed who are well known in the southern U.S. states like Alabama. They are famous for helping hunt raccoons. They are a great watchdog and since they are also a working dog, they have bundles of energy. They are an ideal breed for running.
Photo from puppypoopy.com

11. Dalmations
As you know, Dalmatians are famous for being coach dogs who accompanied horses on their route. They have a high level of energy. If you have one that is prone to deafness, you will have to use good sign commands on your run.

12. Doberman Pinschers
These dogs are known for their superb guard dog abilities. They also make a great running companion if they are well socialized. With a dog this size, you have to watch for hip dysplasia and other joint diseases as they get older.

13. Fox Terriers
As much as these little dogs love people, they were initially bred to hunt animals. They are fearless when it comes to other dogs. Size does not matter. Fox terriers have quite a bit of energy and tend to bark a lot. If they are well-socialized by the time they are six months, it is most likely they won't be aggressive toward other dogs.

14. German Shepherds
What can't these dogs do? Famous for being a police dog, rescue dog and a war dog, these highly intelligent dogs epitomize work. They love to please their owners. With their thick coat, it's best to run them in the cooler times during the summer. As they age, because of their larger size, they are a target for bone and joint problems as well.


15. Jack Russell Terriers
Even though these dogs will stand about 15 inches (38.1 cm) they are one of the original working dogs. They are able to do any activity imaginable with their boundless energy. Their muscular body and athletic nature makes them a great running pal.


16. Rhodesian Ridgeback
Originally bred to hunt lions in South Africa, this docile hound makes a great running companion. It's called a ridgeback because of an area of hair that grows the opposite on its back. Although these guys are hound dogs and they make great couch potatoes, they have a high level of endurance that makes them great distance running dogs.

17. Siberian Huskies
These beauties are always willing to please. Bred to pull, they may be a handful when you first start running. They will have a tendency to circle so with a little time and patience, they can develop into the ultimate running dog. Just like German Shepherds, they need to be run during the cooler times because of their lush coat.
Photo from morguefile.com
18. Standard Poodles
Although poodles are associated with a pampered lifestyle, these dogs have energy to spare. They are highly intelligent, intuitive people-pleasers that love the water and the land. They love to hike and run and the more active you keep them, the more they like it. They are known for their fluffy coat but are really quite substantial underneath it all.


19. Vizslas
These natural hunters are super-affectionate towards their owners. They are naturally high-energy and nothing makes them happier than being with their owner. They do have a sensitive streak. Originating from Hungary, this dog breed thrives in a lifestyle with plenty of outdoor activity. They are medium-sized standing about 22 inches high (55.8cm) and weigh about 50 pounds (23 kg).
Photo from morguefile.com
20. Weimaraner
This tall dog (23 to 27 inches, 58 to 68 cm) originated from the Bloodhound in Germany. This gray beauty is a gentle dog and ideal for children as well as a watch dog. It's known for its high endurance and stamina and muscular physique. When running together, it may get distracted by smaller animals so it's a good idea to have it well-trained before starting your exercise regimen.

Special Mention

Mixed Breeds
Just like pure bred dogs, mix breeds come in all shapes and sizes. Maybe your mutt has some of these breeds' characteristics.

Gigi (pictured above) would be a great dog for running. She's naturally energetic and gets antsy when she hasn't had enough exercise. She loves to run around in circles when she's waiting for me to open the gate when I get back from our walk. If I ran regularly, even though she's smaller, she definitely would be a good candidate for this activity.

Let's Discuss!

Do you run with your dog? What breed of dog have you had the most success?
All dog photos used are from Wikimedia Commons unless otherwise noted.
Other Running With Your Dog Resources
Running With Man's Best Friend
Running with your Dog: A Perfect Way To Improve The Health And Fitness Of Your Dog by Susan Sarubin (Digital Download)
Doggy Blogging

Related Posts
8 Tips For Running With Your Dog
Let's Run A Mini-Pictorial
Workouts for Owners and Dogs

66 comments:

  1. This is slightly off-topic, but what really impresses me about this pictorial is how it illustrates the wide, drastic variations in dog breeds. What amazes me more than anything about dogs is how their breeds vary much, much more than any other domesticated animal. I sometimes find it hard to believe that a Chihuahua and a Great Dane are the same species, but they really are. You don't see cats, ferrets, cows, or pigs varying anywhere near as dramatically in size!

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  2. It is pretty wild how many different breeds that are out there. They all are different in looks and personality. Thanks for commenting.

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    1. This sounds crazy, I run with my 6.8 lbs Chihuahua, he'll turn 3 this Sept. He loves running. I don't run too slowly, I try to average about 8 minute mile. He's usually ahead of me when we run then he'll slow a bit after about 3 miles but he's literally the same pace. After 3 miles, if we stop, he'll give me the look saying, "that's all?" If we do about 5 or 6 miles, he looked like he's had a good workout, we've done a 7 miler as well but longer than that, I don't take him. I talked to the vet about, she doesn't think he's got any joints issues and that if I notice any (kicking his back legs, etc), then stop. But if he likes it, keeping him in shape by running does a lot of good for him. His little brother who's 3.5 lbs, I only take him for short walks and he's happy. I'm guessing that every dog is different even the same breed.

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    2. Ana, with dogs nothing ceases to amaze me. Chihuahuas are very determined dogs and if they enjoy running, I don't see the problem. As long as the surface you're running on isn't too hard on the joints, he sounds like a natural. My Shi Tzu Poo loves to have a good run for 2 minutes. She really loves it. To look at her, you wouldn't think that. Thanks for sharing. :)

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    3. My chihuahua/ pug (chug) and beagle/ pug mixes love running too. My little chug girl is pretty much done after three miles, but that barely fazes my pug/ beagle. The longest Ive ever taken him for is 5 miles, and he was pretty tired after, but he was back to playing fetch after an hour nap. I don't push them too hard, maybe an 8-9 minute mile. Once a lady stopped me to tell me I shouldn't run them, but I live in LA so it never gets too hot and I always take them out early. Should I be worried?

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  3. I continue to be surprised to see the Pit Bull as a long distance running dog. Judging a book by its cover I would assume that it would be better for short and fast runs. Learning new things everyday.

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  4. Good point. With their pushed in noses, they may not last as much as the other ones. However, the reason I said pitbulls could be long distance runners is because of their stamina. They are extremely energetic. However, each dog is different. There are some who don't like to run at all. They're ideal for 5 miles or more. I guess they would be in-between then.

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  5. I have a boxer/coonhound mix and she can twice as far as me at twice the speed

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  6. Hello Thomas and welcome. :) I totally understand how your dog can be that way. Hunting dogs are known for their endurance and boxers have a huge amount of energy. I've seen some dogs run like crazy and I still get tired. Thanks for writing in.

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  7. I have a 6 yr old Jack Russell who I would like to run with...would be good for both of us! We adopted him as an adult dog. He sustained a badly broken front leg when he was a puppy which was not set properly so it is misaligned. He causes him no pain and does not slow him down in the least...it turns out quite sharply, almost a 90 degree angle from the other one. But even though it does not cause him any pain now, I worry that if I run him it might cause problems for him as he ages.

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  8. That's terrific that the injury hasn't slowed your dog down. Sometimes, it depends if the dog winds up getting arthritis when they get older. Other times, dogs learn to get by without being 100%. It's really great that you rescued him, and it's probably great that he gets the exercise he needs from running. When dogs are in pain or ready to stop, they usually let us know.

    Thanks for sharing your story about your JRT. :D

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    1. Actually, dogs tend not to let us know when they are in pain. It is a survival instinct for most dogs to mask pain until they can no longer bear it. Always best to discuss with your vert if you doubt your dog's health or abilities.

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    2. Hi Britney, thanks for your comments. That's a great point. Let me clarify a little. I meant extreme pain. Also, I go by example from my dog Cookie. She really enjoys going on walks but if it's been too much for her, she will let us know.

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  9. Hello Elena. I'm planning to get a dog. I haven't had any before. Always wanted to but wanted to first make sure that I know more and I'm able commit the time and attention as well. I run and have been reading up on which would be the best dog to have as a family dog and a running companion as well. I'm not a hardcore runner/jogger. The most I run/jog is about 5 miles or lesser, about 3 - 4 days a week. I'm looking for a small sized dog. I've managed to narrow down to a JRT and a Beagle. I learnt a little bit about JRT thanks to Mairi's sharing. Could you share your experiences and knowledge on these two dogs (JRT & Beagle - which would be a better option for me to go with)and if there are any types of dogs that you'd have me consider? Truly appreciate your advise.

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  10. Hi Garret. That's quite a question you ask. Both breeds can be very energetic and have been bred to hunt first and foremost. My dog Homer who's a beagle, has a high energy drive. He can run well but the minute he sniffs a rabbit scent he will become distracted. Some beagles have lower energy levels too. So, I think if you were to get a beagle as a puppy that was young enough (9 months), it makes a great companion for jogging.

    As for JRTs, I think they would be fantastic. I used to walk one and because he didn't get the adequate exercise that the breed needed, he would be bouncing off the walls when I would come. They have abundant energy.

    I think 5 miles (8km) is ideal for either. Homer loves to have his morning nap after I walk him. I can always tell when he gets antsy because he will bark for no reason. Both dogs thrive in a home that has a fenced in yard because they will stop at nothing when their hunting instincts call. From what I know about JRTs they require special handling because they are always wanting to do something. So I would say that a Beagle is a little more laid back than a JRT but again, it comes down to the dog itself.

    One more thing, both dogs are smaller, so their joints are not going to absorb the impact of concrete as well as a larger dogs. It's important to start them off gradually. Many owners who are runners give Glucosamine Chondroitin as a supplement to help protect their joints. That may be something to consider.

    Thanks for writing in. Please keep me posted about your quest to find the right dog. I hope that 2012 treats you well.

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  11. Thank you so much Elena for the valuable sharing. It will definitely help in my quest to finding the right dog. And yes, I will keep you posted and share my experiences as well. Once again, thank you so much and here's wishing you a splendid 2012.

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  12. Hi i am looking for a good dog for me a runner and playful. Any ideas.

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  13. Hi India. Most of the dogs above are ideal for running and have a playful side. The best choice for you depends on your living situation and environment. I know that labrador retrievers and Schnauzers can be especially playful. However the ideal choice depends on what are the most important qualities you're looking for in a dog. Thanks for writing in.

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  14. I saw a kelpie and was considering it to my list of good adoption dog. This one gets out but seems to be energetic and fun. is it a good choice, are they good behaved, and what do you know about these dogs.

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  15. I don't know about Australian Kelpies. They are shepherd dogs, which makes them working dogs. They are going to need room to run in a large yard. If you have an apartment without adequate yard space, this may not be the best dog. They are used to having a job to do. If they get bored, they'll become destructive.

    As for running long distances, that's something they would be equipped to do. They are good for jogging and running. It's important not to let the dog lead so there aren't alpha issues. Ideally, they should be at least a year or older so all their bones are developed. Hope that helps.

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  16. My 40 lb amstaff mix is a great runner. We run up to 10 miles together in the mountains and he loves it. He drinks from my water bottle when he's thirsty. I didn't think he would be this good of a runner when we rescued him- I've always wanted a vizsla. He really has impressed me though and is such a tough little guy.

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  17. ever heard of a german wirehaired pointer? I run 7to 10 miles everyday they are the best ever especially nevada bred wirehairs!!!

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    1. That's a famous breed for hunting. I can see why it works great as a running buddy for you. Thanks for writing in.

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  18. Hi! My name is Matalie and I'm trying to find a good dog for running about two miles a day with, and then later on in the day a two mile walk. My boyfriend and I currently have a pretty small apartment, and would like him to be able to sleep with us, so nothing too huge. Also, our roommate has a cat, so something that generally gets along with other animals would be ideal. We do have a fenced in yard, but, like our apartment, it is also pretty small. Which of these breeds would you suggest fits our situation best?

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    1. Hi Matalie. I would say there are quite a few factors that play into whether a dog gets along with cats such as prey drive and personality. Generally, the younger the dog and cat are, the more likely the chance is that they will get along. Also, a very helpful resource is your local pet rescue group or shelter. Many times, they will test the dog to see how they get along with other pets.

      I think good apartment dogs that enjoy jogging would be Bichon Frise, Basenji (The Singing Dog), Cocker Spaniel, Boxer, and Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier. Also, you may want to consider a mixed breed. It helps to do as much research as you can to see what type of dog fits. Thank you for writing and please keep me posted.

      Elena :D

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  19. Hi Elena,
    Thanks for your great blog.

    I love whippets for their gentle & and affectionate temperament and I'm considering getting one, but I'm not sure if it would really be the right breed. So, before maybe making a mistake, I would be grateful for your advice. I love running long distances and from what I've read on the web I'm not sure a whippet could cope. I run 4 days a week, with two shorter runs (10 km) and two longer runs (16 km and 22 km). Would that be too much? If so, can you think of a breed with a similar temperament but with higher endurance?
    Many thanks,
    Jan

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  20. Hi Jan. Whippets would be good for the 10km walks but one dog that comes to mind is the weinmaraner. They have short hair and are known for running. Another good one is the Visla.
    With running dogs having typically higher energy levels, it's extremely important to get them socialized at a young age, if you're getting a puppy. I wish you luck on finding the right dog. Please keep me posted and thanks for writing. :D

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  21. Hi all!

    Anybody think they can help mme find a dog for me? I'm looking for a small dog since iI live in a studio wwithout a yard that i ccan jog with, slow paced, about 3-6 mikes), that doesnt nneed a lot oof grooming/doesn't shed, doesn't bark too much, and is really friendly (we will be running in places where there are a lot oof people, dogs, kids, etc. I grew up with dogs but have never owned one of my own before. I don't have a car but would be able to take a dog around if it fit in the milk crate of my bicycle...

    I know there are a lot of specifications i am ggoing by, but I wouldn't want to put any dog, myself, or anybody else in an uncomfortable situation..

    Thanks!

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    1. Hi. You can try the Bedlington Terrier, Bichon Frise or Cairn Terrier (Toto from the Wizard of Oz was this breed). Good Luck in finding a dog. I think the Bichon would be best for shorter distances or does well if you run slow-paced. You may want to read into these breed further to see which makes the best fit. Thanks for commenting.

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  22. My girlfriend just got a four month old dalmation. I am wanting to take her (the dog) on runs with me but didn't want to do too much too soon. What would be a good pace, distance, and runs per week for her to start? (I run a sub 7 mile, distance from 1 to 6 miles.)

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    1. That's a question that's best suited for a vet. However, I believe you should wait a year because the bones in a puppy take time to fully develop. Thanks for writing in.

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  23. My American Pit Bull Terrier has been the best running/hiking partner I've had. Before I got her I had a Dalmatian that was a good runner also.(RIP) Both those breeds can keep up for long runs and as far as my experience goes are easy to train to run off leash by your side.

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  24. Thank you for this helpful post. I actually start a FB Fanpage because I wanted to find out about dogs to run with and to hear about people's experiences about running with their dogs. This will help me make a good decision on the choice of dog to get. thanks again.

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    1. That's fantastic! Running is very popular in this country and is a great way. Thanks for your comments.

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  25. I am having trouble finding the right breed for me :-/ I have a French bulldog &she is PERFECT! I LOVE her!!!! Everything about her! Anyway I would like a second dog to run with. I only run 9-15 miles a week but I would like to increase that as I get in better shape. I live in the south east so even though i run early in the morning it is still hot & humid. I feel the obvious answer is a vizsla but I'm not so sure.... I'm worried they have waaaaaay too much energy for me! To complicate things ideally I would like a low shedding dog. A few of my favorite looking dogs is an Australian cattle dog, cane corso & an aussiedoodle. My other 1/2 wants me to get a bouvier de flandres or a few very slender breeds that are French & very rare their name escapes me at the moment. Please help!

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    1. It sounds like you are really torn. While any of these breeds are good for running, maybe you should consider another factor. I would look at the low shedding dogs you're interested in. I think ACDs shed. However, poodle mixes are low shedding. I would look at a breed that has a sturdy bone structure since you will be running quite a bit. I think the best judge would be your French Bulldog. You want a companion who would get along best with her. I would take her along when you have found a contender and see whom she has the best interaction with. Good luck and please let me know how things work out for you.

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  26. My American pitbull terrier barely makes it... I have to take our Siberian husky/Shepherd for runs instead of her now.

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    1. All dogs are different. Pit Bulls have pushed in noses, so they may be better for shorter distances. Thanks for your comments.

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  27. I have a lab-pit mix. She has been the best running partner. When she was younger, she would do up to twelve mile runs with me. She is nine now and slowing down some, she is good with 3 miles. She still goes bonkers when I get her leash out for her daily exercise.

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  28. My Jack Russell/Beagle mutt is the best running partner! He stays by my side and goes whatever pace I'm running. A great way to get his energy out while staying fit.

    A few side notes - I use a harness instead of a collar because he occasionally does "have to stop" to sniff and chase the occasional squirrel. I felt like I was choking him with the collar - the harness allows better control and more comfort for him. It does mean a few extra stops while you're running, but it is 100% worth it.

    Also - be careful about the temperature when you're running with your pup. My rule of thumb is 70 degrees or higher is just too hot to take him with me. He can run in the cold no problem.

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    1. He sounds just like my beagle. They sure love to sniff. Thanks for sharing about your lovable mix. He sounds like a great partner. :)

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  29. Hey Elena!! I have 2 Old English Sheepdogs. The girl is 3 years old and not so keen on running, therefore we like to keep her coat long and she likes it more that way and shes pretty lazy. Might not sound like a good dog to run with at first, however, the male i have, who is 1 1/2 years old and whos coat i keep shaved or very short is the most wonderful runner. I go out normally 8km - 12km every single night and he loves it... he is faster than me and i´m not exactly a slow runner. He never complains, always so well behaved (especially afterwards). He likes to stop for a quick pee sometimes and maybe a quick breather. I´m thinking about steping up his and my training to the 15km mark, in your opinion is this too much for him? Also, how tired should i really be making him? Its something i always worry about. One more thing is i wanted to reply to was some of the comments saying the dog will not let you know when they are too tired, in my experience mine will, he looks at me and i know what that look means.

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  30. I own a male pitbull ter (Hobey) and 1 female English Staffordshire ter (Kahlua): I like to inline skate on a local greenway, both of my dogs are fairly lazy and only enjoy a few miles of a medium speed- of which they are couch buddies the rest of the week "recouperating". I do babysit a very large, strong, and ultrahyperactive female pit (Haley)and she enjoys (absolutely LOVES) running next to me for 7 miles. She comes home, snoozes for a couple hours, and by the next day, her energy is back to high level and is ready to do it again (..only thing, I'm not!). They are good dogs to have while skating along, though.

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  31. Thanks for this blog post, we're researching breeds at the moment and one of our criteria is that it can come running with me (10-15 miles a week). We have never had a dog before and we have young children and cats so we're a bit wary of choosing the right dog. We're hoping to get an adult rescue that's been tested with children and cats.

    One breed we are considering is a beagle (husband wants a low-shedding breed if possible) but I've heard they can be really hard to train and so don't make good jogging partners. I'd like something that I can let off the lead every once in a while for a run around in the woods or on the beach. Would this rule out a beagle?

    Thanks :)

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    1. Well, since Homer is a beagle, I can answer that from experience. Homer is the type of dog who sniffs out his surroundings. When he really loves to run, it's because he's hot on the trail of a rabbit. Beagles are extremely food-motivated, and since they are bred for hunting, they make good companions.

      Portuguese Water Dogs would be excellent companions that don't shed a lot. I think Laborador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers are excellent family dogs, but alas, they tend to shed.

      Really, when choosing a dog, it's best to test them out with your cat in a neutral area because it will be an adjustment. Good luck in finding a dog, and please let me know what happens. Thanks for writing in.

      Elena :)

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  32. Elena, I really enjoyed reading your article, i learned a lot. I live in an medium apartment, and im looking for a medium size dog who can go for 5-8 mile runs and sometimes going cross country. I also enjoy going to the beach a lot, so im leaning towards a Jack Russel. What d you think? Any other breeds that arent too big that you can recommend me? thanks

    LB

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    1. Hi LB. Thank you so much. Jack Russells are great running dogs but they have quite a bit of energy. I remember during my dog walking days there was a Jack Russell Terrier who would be kept in the apartment when the owner was at work. There would be some destruction because of that. Jack Russells are awesome dogs, but if your schedule during the day keeps you away from home, I'd recommend putting a Jack Russell in day care.

      Soft-coated Wheaten Terriers have become quite popular because they don't shed a lot and tend to be active. I also think Australian Shepherds are good for running even though they are herding dogs. If you can find a way to keep them occupied, they'll enjoy it.Shiba Inus are good for running. You can't go wrong with a Portuguese Water Dog because they love to run and swim. They're bigger than Jack Russells but are not too big of a dog. Lastly, Cocker Spaniels are great for apartments.

      What's most important is doing your research beforehand, so you can understand your potential dog's motivation and behavior. Good luck in finding a dog. Please let me know how things work out.

      Elena :)

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  33. I run with my miniature Dachshunds. You can add them to your "short" list :) My Chester used to be able to run about 6 miles with me but not so much now that he is older. He can still hike 10 miles in a day though!

    Just discovered your blog through BlogPaws so I am adding it to my reader :)

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  34. I have a lab terrier mix that weighs about 60 lbs and is a medium sized dog. What would be a good way to get her excersise if she is not willing to run. Also I am a cross country runner and I average a 6 minute mile if I go fast but I prefer two mile runs what type of dog would work with this and having another dog around

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    1. You can try skating with her or using a bicycle attachment. If she's just not in the mood, you can train her to walk a treadmill. Taking her to a dog park or dog beach is a good option as well.

      I would say any dog would be good for this. I would think you would want a dog with a superhigh energy level like a jack russell terrier. So, maybe I would go with a beagle, golden retriever or a boxer. Rhodesian Ridgebacks or another similar breed may be a good choice as well. Thanks for writing.

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    2. Oops, I meant that you wouldn't want a dog with a high energy level. My mistake. :O

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  35. I'm looking for a good family dog, who can also run with me for 1/2 -1 hour 5-6 days a week. I've looked at poodles and german wirehaired pointer lab crosses, any other suggestions? I want a dog that can play with my kids but won't push them around, and I know that a big part of that is training which I will definitely do, but I want an energetic dog too, is that even possible?

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    1. Sorry, I haven't replied sooner. I had a technical glitch that I didn't notice until today. In response to your question, you want a high energy dog that is kid-friendly. Labs, beagles and boxers all fall into this category. However, with their short noses, you definitely want to watch the amount of time. Other good family breeds are Portuguese water dogs and soft-coated wheaten terriers. Good luck with your search for a family dog.

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    2. Boxers have short noses. Sorry I didn't make that clear earlier.

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  36. Hi Elena
    I am from India and was searching “long distance running dog” at Google and this post came up. I generally do 10-15K and am looking for a dog as a companion. The breeds (commonly) available are like Rottweiler (not so common), Labrador, German Shepherd and Doberman Pinscher. Among these, I am likely to take a Rottweiler. What do you suggest?

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    1. Hello Friend. Welcome. I wouldn't recommend using a Rottweiler as a running companion. They are great dogs, however, with their large build, they are not built for running that distance. They are also prone to ACL injuries. Of the ones that you have mentioned, I would suggest a Labrador retriever or a German Shephard. Good luck in your search.

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  37. Thanks Elena.
    Where i stay the temperature is generally around 80-86 (Fahrenheit) with the exception of summers (roughly 2 months) when the temperature is in excess of 100.
    So i think Labrador retriever will be a better choice.
    Well, once again thanks. will keep you posted for good advice.

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    1. You're very welcome. Have a great day!

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  38. I have a Labrador/German Shepherd puppy who is now 10 months old. He is on the small side right around 55 pounds and I cannot wait to start running with him! I am going to wait until he is 13 months old before I begin training him in the sand, and then move onto roads once he gets used to it. I know a lot of people who get antzy and want to start running with their pups, but I recommend to spend that time obedience training the pup so that he/she will become the perfect running companion! He just passed basic obedience and is moving onto intermediate obedience yayyy!

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    1. I couldn't agree with you more. You definitely are doing right by your pup. Good luck with him. Thanks for writing in as well.

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  39. I have a Australian cattle dog (red Heeler) who is the best running dog I could ever ask for. We did 12 miles together yesterday!

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  40. I run with my 2 mixed breed dogs , a lab/collie mix and a husky/Australian stag hound, fabulous runners and love the uk winter weather( normally all year round but this year we had a summer!) including snow.
    We run through the fields and up in the hills through an old Iron Age fort complete with wild ponies.

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    1. With thick coats like that I can imagine. It seems like winter running is getting more popular these days. Thank you for commenting.

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  41. Hi Anonymous,

    I think if you really watch them, it will be fine. In the early morning, the uv rays are less strong and LA usually doesn't have issues with humidity. It's good for the dogs. Most dogs love running because it brings them back to their roots. Unless the ground you're running on is really hard (which you can use lightweight booties to absorb the impact), I really don't forsee it being a problem.

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  42. I want a border collie or Australian cattle dog so bad! I would love to train one to help me round up my free range chickens!

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    1. Those and Australian Shepherds would be good for that.

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